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COVID-19 Resources & Testing

During this crisis, we are doing our part to provide our communities and those who need our help the most with access to credible COVID-19 information and testing. On this landing page, we have compiled helpful and accurate COVID-19 resources for your reference (see FAQs and Resources sections below). We are also working diligently with our laboratory partner to help make testing available to those who need it most. As a first step, we are gathering information and order requests from hospitals with urgent patient needs and first responder groups to understand their needs and try to help in any way that we can.

If you are a hospital with urgent patient needs or a first responder group in need of COVID-19 testing, please visit this page.

If you are an individual who doesn't fall in the above category who wants to be notified if/when we are able to provide testing direct to your home through our telemedicine partner, please fill out the quick form below.

Please Note: By filling out the form below, you are no way guaranteed testing if/when we launch consumer-initiated at-home testing. It will be subject to supply and demand. Additionally, every individual will fill out an eligibility screener to ensure that testing is appropriate and available to you at this time. What we can promise you is that we will inform you when ordering is live.

COVID-19 Form for Individuals

COVID-19 FAQs

What is Coronavirus (COVID-19)?

This test checks for SARS-CoV-2, the new virus that causes coronavirus disease (also called COVID-19), a respiratory illness.

How does COVID-19 spread?

COVID-19 spreads from person-to-person. When an infected person coughs, sneezes, or exhales air, droplets containing the virus go into the air and onto surfaces and objects around them. Other people are exposed to the virus by breathing in these droplets or by touching their eyes, nose, or mouth after touching infected surfaces.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Symptoms may appear 2 to 14 days after being exposed to the virus. The most common symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • New or worsening cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

Other less common symptoms may include:

  • Tiredness
  • Body or muscle aches
  • Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • Sore throat
  • Runny nose

Cases of COVID-19 range from mild to severe. Some people who are infected don’t have any symptoms and don’t feel sick. Most people have mild symptoms. More severe cases have been seen in older adults and those with weakened immune systems (including pregnant women) or underlying health issues (such as lung disease, diabetes, heart disease, kidney or liver disease, cancer, transplant, and AIDS

How is COVID-19 treated?

There is currently no treatment for COVID-19. Not all patients with COVID-19 will require medical attention, and most people recover within 2 weeks without any specific treatment. For severe cases, hospitalization may be required. Treatment focuses on managing symptoms.

Who should get tested?

This test may be helpful if you:

  • Currently have symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Currently have symptoms and live in or have recently traveled to an area with ongoing spread of COVID-19.
  • Have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19.
  • Think you may have been exposed to COVID-19.

Who should not get tested?

This test may not be helpful if you:

  • Currently have severe symptoms that limit your daily activities. Seek medical attention right away if this is the case.
  • Do not have symptoms and have not been exposed to COVID-19.
  • Do not have symptoms and have not been to an area with ongoing spread of COVID-19.

What will my test results tell me?

Your test results will confirm whether or not you are infected with COVID-19. If your results are positive, it is important to limit your exposure to other people and continue to monitor your symptoms. If your results are negative, you are not infected with COVID-19. However, it is important to note that the virus may not be detected by the test in early stages of infection when a person doesn't have any symptoms. If you have reason to believe you have been exposed, it is important to follow up with a physician for further evaluation or to get retested.

After receiving your results, you will have an opportunity to speak with a licensed physician, who can answer any questions you may have about your test results and help determine next steps in care.

Are there any risks involved in getting this test?

There is no risk involved in getting this test. You will get a nose swab. You will have the option to get tested at a lab or receive this test as a
home kit.

How do I prepare for the test?

You do not need to do anything to prepare for the test. Further instructions will be provided to you at the lab or in your test kit.

Who is at high risk of getting very sick?

Most people have mild symptoms. More severe and fatal cases have been seen in older adults and those with weakened immune systems (including pregnant women) or underlying health issues (such as lung disease, diabetes, heart disease, kidney or liver disease, cancer, transplant, and AIDS).

Am I at risk?

The risk of getting COVID-19 depends on many factors, including where you live, recent travel history, and close contact with people who have symptoms. The risk of getting COVID-19 from someone with no symptoms is very low. It is important to comply with any local travel restrictions and to protect yourself from exposure if you are in a city or area where the disease is spreading.

How is COVID-19 treated?

There is currently no treatment for COVID-19. Mild cases of COVID-19 may not require medical attention, and most people recover within 2 weeks without any specific treatment. For severe cases, hospitalization may be required. Treatment focuses on managing your symptoms.

What can I do to prevent spreading COVID-19?

If you test positive for COVID-19 and have mild symptoms, the following steps can help prevent the disease from spreading to others:

  • Stay home
    • Stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home
    • Restrict any activities outside your home, except for getting medical care
    • Avoid public areas, including work and school
    • Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis
  • Cover your nose and mouth
    • If you are sick, wear a facemask when you are around other people or pets
    • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, and throw away used tissues
  •  Wash hands
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
    • Wash your hands especially after blowing your nose, coughing, sneezing, going to the bathroom, or before eating or preparing food
    • If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, mouth, and other people with unwashed hands
  • Do not share
    • Do not share dishes, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets
    • After using personal items, they should be washed thoroughly with soap and water
  • Clean and disinfect
    • Clean high touch surfaces such as counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables
    • Clean any surfaces that may come in contact with body fluids, blood, or stool
    • Use a household cleaning spray or wipes
    • Immediately remove and wash clothes or bedding that have body fluids, blood, or stool on them

When should I seek medical care?

If you think you have been exposed, it is important to closely monitor symptoms. Seek medical attention immediately if you develop any symptoms, especially if you experience any of the following:

  • Fever greater than 102 °F (taken with a thermometer)
  • Severe difficulty breathing
  • Coughing up blood
  • Chest pain
  • Swelling in the legs
  • Irregular heart rhythm
  • Yellowing of skin or whites of eyes
  • Dark-colored urine or urinating less often, or in smaller amounts than usual
  • Persistent vomiting or diarrhea
  • Intense abdominal pain

If you seek medical attention, be sure to call ahead before visiting the facility. This will help the facility keep other people from possibly getting infected or exposed. 

  • Tell any healthcare provider that you may have COVID-19. 
  • Put on a facemask before you enter your healthcare facility. 

I’m currently having symptoms. Should I see my doctor?

 

    •  Most mild cases of COVID-19 resolve within 2 weeks without treatment. Continue to monitor your symptoms.

    • You should seek medical attention immediately if your symptoms get worse, especially if you experience:

      • Severe shortness of breath

      •  Continuous pain or pressure in the chest

      • Persistent fever greater than 102°F

Someone I was around has symptoms. Should I get tested?

 

    • You should not get tested unless you develop symptoms within 14 days of having close contact with that person.

    • Close contact includes being within approximately 6 feet of that person for a prolonged period of time or having direct contact with their fluids, like being coughed on.

Someone I was around has coronavirus. Should I get tested?

 

  • You should get tested if you develop symptoms within 14 days of having close contact with someone with COVID-19.

  • Close contact includes being within approximately 6 feet of someone with COVID-19 for a prolonged period of time or having direct contact with fluids of someone with COVID-19, like being coughed on.

I have traveled to an area with coronavirus. Should I get tested?

You should get tested if you develop symptoms within 14 days of traveling to an area where COVID-19 is spreading.

Someone I know traveled to an area with coronavirus. Should I get tested?

 

  • You should not get tested unless you develop symptoms within 14 days of having close contact with that person.

  • Close contact includes being within approximately 6 feet of that person for a prolonged period of time or having direct contact with their fluids, like being coughed on.

Should I self-quarantine? How does self-quarantine work?

 

    • If you think you may have been exposed to COVID-19, it is very important to stay home and limit your interaction with others in your household and in public.

    • Self-quarantine means separating yourself from others when you have been exposed to a contagious disease but haven’t tested positive.

    • For COVID-19, the period of quarantine is 14 days from the last date of exposure, since the disease should resolve within 2 weeks.

    • If you have tested positive for COVID-19, isolation is recommended so that you do not pass the virus to others.

What’s the difference between quarantine and isolation?

 

    • Isolation and quarantine are both ways to limit your interaction with others to prevent the spread of disease.

    • Isolation is separating sick people with COVID-19 from people who are not sick.

    • Quarantine is separating and restricting the movement of people who were exposed to COVID-19 to see if they become sick.

COVID-19 Resources

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